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Threads that are just too cool to even have to search for them. RULE: you can't create a thread in here, a moderator has to move it from any other location.

TOPIC: Daily Facts about WW1

Daily Facts about WW1 3 years 7 months ago #340761

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" When i am afraid i will trust in you " ~Psalm 56:3
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Daily Facts about WW1 3 years 7 months ago #340886

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On October 26, 1917, the Soviet government issued a decree of peace, insisting that all belligerent powers open immediate negotiations for a democratic peace without annexations, and guarantee the right of every nation to self-determination (Russia was the only nation to do so at the end of the war, allowing all the former territories of Russia to self-determination. Independence was short lived however, as each republic was later incorporated/annexed into the Soviet Union by Stalin.) . The Entente refused to recognise the Soviet government, and continued the war. The Soviet government signed the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk on March 3, 1918, ending four years of aggression between Russia and Germany.
www.marxists.org/glossary/events/w/ww1/russia.htm

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Daily Facts about WW1 3 years 7 months ago #341066

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Daily Facts about WW1 3 years 7 months ago #341494

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Hey guys sorry for the wait here are some facts about the Nieuport 28!
...see what i did there? B)


The Nieuport 28 C.1 was a French biplane fighter aircraft flown during World War I, built by Nieuport and designed by Gustave Delage. Owing its lineage to the successful line of sesquiplane fighters that included the Nieuport 17, the Nieuport 28 continued a similar design philosophy of a lightweight and highly maneuverable aircraft.

By the time the Nieuport 28 was available, the SPAD XIII had been chosen to equip the escadrilles de chasse of the Aéronautique Militaire for 1918, and this fighter was also the first choice for the projected American "pursuit" squadrons.[2] In the event, a shortage of SPADs led to Nieuport 28s being issued to four American squadrons between March and August 1918, and these became the first aircraft to see operational service with an American fighter squadron.

Nieuport 28s saw considerable post-war service: in particular 50 from a second batch ordered later were "returned" to America, and as well as army and naval service these found civilian use, especially in Hollywood films.

Here we have Eddie Rickenbacker and his Nieuport 28
en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nieuport_28

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Daily Facts about WW1 3 years 7 months ago #341838

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The American author and journalist Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961) volunteered for the front in early 1918. He drove ambulances for two months after his arrival in the battlefield until he was wounded. Still only 18, Hemingway said at the time: "When you go to war as a boy you have a great illusion of immortality. Other people get killed; not you.Then when you are badly wounded the first time you lose that illusion and you know it can happen to you."

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Daily Facts about WW1 3 years 7 months ago #342144

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Daily Facts about WW1 3 years 6 months ago #343818

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Although technology had dramatically changed the nature of warfare by 1914, the armies of the major combatants had not correctly anticipated the implications. The French and German armies adopted dramatically different tactical doctrines. The French relied on the attack with speed and surprise. The Germans relied on firepower, investing heavily in howitzers and machine guns. The British lacked a coherent tactical doctrine, with an officer corps that rejected theory in favour of pragmatism.[22]

While the armies expected to use entrenchments and cover, they did not allow for the effect of defences in depth. They required a deliberate approach to seizing positions from which fire support could be given for the next phase of the attack, rather than a rapid move to break the enemy's line.[23] Critically, it was assumed that artillery could still destroy entrenched troops, or at least suppress them sufficiently for friendly infantry and cavalry to manoeuvre.[24]
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trench_warfare#World_War_I:_Entrenchment

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Daily Facts about WW1 3 years 6 months ago #343821

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WB|War hawk1-5 wrote: last week i had the opportunity to visit the National Naval Air Museum in Pensacola, Florida!
they have many WW1 planes to see and many other beautiful planes from between the World Wars and after!!!!
here are some pictures i was able to take of some of the WW1 era airplanes!!
edit:welp... i could not get the pictures i took to post!!!! ugggh well here are the pictures from the website
a fokker d 7!!!!



a sopwith camel!!! this camel was flown off an american aircraft carrier and was flown by the first american naval aviation ace David S. Ingalls!

here we have a Hanriot HD-1!!!

you can see the museum's selection of aircraft here at their official website
www.navalaviationmuseum.org


Sorry I missed this post. I was stationed at NAS Pensacola and our command would use the museum for retirement ceremonies, under the Blue Angels. What an awesome museum. WarHawk, had I known you were that close I would have tried to meet up somewhere. Dang!







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Daily Facts about WW1 3 years 6 months ago #343833

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Love that place! Fort Pickens out on Santa Rosa is pretty cool too.
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Daily Facts about WW1 3 years 6 months ago #343864

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[NLR]Jacob10000 wrote: Love that place! Fort Pickens out on Santa Rosa is pretty cool too.


That's where they held Geronimo prisoner, correct? The one with the turret that exploded? Yes, that place is pretty cool as well. I cannot remember the name of the fort across the channel that you can only access now by boat.







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Daily Facts about WW1 3 years 6 months ago #343871

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Yep, that's the one. I was just reading to see what the other one is, and I found a third fort. Fort McRee is the one on Perdido Key, and fort Barrancas is right by the NAS.
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Daily Facts about WW1 3 years 6 months ago #343908

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[NLR]Jacob10000 wrote: Love that place! Fort Pickens out on Santa Rosa is pretty cool too.

yep. been there a few times... went there same time i went to the naval air museum.

fort Pickens is great and yes they did hold Geronimo for period of time.

i took pictures at fort Pickens but since i couldn't get my original plane pics to post i just didn't try and do the fort

btw it is a great place to camp B)

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Last edit: by WB|War hawk1-5.

Daily Facts about WW1 3 years 6 months ago #343909

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Viper10{WP} wrote:

[NLR]Jacob10000 wrote: Love that place! Fort Pickens out on Santa Rosa is pretty cool too.


That's where they held Geronimo prisoner, correct? The one with the turret that exploded? Yes, that place is pretty cool as well. I cannot remember the name of the fort across the channel that you can only access now by boat.

yes! and a turret did explode at fort Pickens also one exploded at fort Morgan.. killing a man who lived in Sumterville

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Daily Facts about WW1 3 years 6 months ago #343911

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General of the Armies John Joseph "Black Jack" Pershing (September 13, 1860 – July 15, 1948) was a senior United States Army officer, most famous as the commander of the American Expeditionary Force (AEF) on the Western Front in World War I, 1917–18. He rejected British and French demands that American forces be integrated with their armies, and insisted that the AEF would operate as a single unit under his command, although some American divisions fought under British command, and he also allowed all-black units to be integrated with the French army. American forces first saw serious battle at Cantigny, Chateau-Thierry, Belleau Wood, and Soissons. To speed up the arrival of the doughboys, they embarked for France leaving the heavy equipment behind, and used British and French tanks, artillery, airplanes and other munitions. In September 1918 at St. Mihiel, the First Army was directly under Pershing's command; it overwhelmed the salient which the German Army had held for three years. For the Meuse-Argonne Offensive, Pershing shifted roughly 600,000 American soldiers to the heavily defended forests of the Argonne, keeping his divisions engaged in hard fighting for 47 days, alongside the French. The Allied Hundred Days Offensive, which the Argonne fighting was part of, resulted in Germany calling for an armistice. Pershing was of the opinion that the war should continue and that all of Germany should be occupied in an effort to permanently destroy German militarism.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_J._Pershing


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Daily Facts about WW1 3 years 6 months ago #343936

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WB|War hawk1-5 wrote:

[NLR]Jacob10000 wrote: Love that place! Fort Pickens out on Santa Rosa is pretty cool too.

yep. been there a few times... went there same time i went to the naval air museum.

fort Pickens is great and yes they did hold Geronimo for period of time.

i took pictures at fort Pickens but since i couldn't get my original plane pics to post i just didn't try and do the fort

btw it is a great place to camp B)


Next time you plan a trip, pm me beforehand. Its a drive but I would try to make time.







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Daily Facts about WW1 3 years 6 months ago #344425

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Daily Facts about WW1 3 years 6 months ago #344456

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Nebular wrote:

on September 15 in 1918 – World War I: Allied troops break through the Bulgarian defenses on the Macedonian Front.
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/September_15
thank you for that neb! i was actually planning on doing that today haha

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Daily Facts about WW1 3 years 6 months ago #344649

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The Polish Legions (Polish Legiony Polskie) was a name of the Polish military force (the first active Polish army in generations)[1] established in August 1914 in Galicia soon after the First World War erupted between the opposing alliances of the Triple Entente on one side (including the British Empire, the French Republic and the Russian Empire); and the Central Powers on the other side, including the German Empire and Austria-Hungary.[2] The Legions became "a founding myth for the creation of modern Poland" in spite of their considerably short existence;[1] they were replaced by the Polish Auxiliary Corps (Polish: Polski Korpus Posiłkowy) formation on 20 September 1916, merged with Polish II Corps in Russia on 19 February 1918 for the Battle of Rarańcza against Austria-Hungary, and disbanded following the military defeat at the Battle of Kaniów in May 1918,[3] against imperial Germany. General Haller escaped to France to form the Polish army in the West against the anti-Polish German-Bolshevik treaty.[4]

The Legions took part in many battles against the forces of the Imperial Russia, both in Galicia and in the Carpathian Mountains. They suffered horrendous casualties outnumbered three to one in the Battle of Łowczówek. They captured Kielce, and in 1915 took part in the offensive on Warsaw. In June 1916 the unit had approximately 25,000 soldiers.[1] Both the number of troops and the composition of units changed rapidly. After the Battle of Kostiuchnówka where 2,000 Polish soldiers died delaying a Russian offensive Józef Piłsudski demanded that the Central Powers issue a guarantee of independence for Poland and partially succeeded.[5] The Polish Legions became the Polish Auxiliary Corps. After the Act of 5th November of 1916 which pronounced the creation of the puppet Kingdom of Poland of 1916–18, the Polish Legions were transferred under German command. However, most of the members refused to swear allegiance to the German Kaiser and were interned in Beniaminów and Szczypiorno (the Oath crisis). Approximately 3,000 of them were drafted into the Austro-Hungarian army and the failed German Polnische Wehrmacht, while approximately 7,500 stayed in the Austrian Polish Auxiliary Corps. They were sent to the Italian Front.


en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_Legions_in_World_War_I

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Daily Facts about WW1 3 years 6 months ago #345086

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I just finished watching 2 of 3 episodes of the long shadow Netflix. Which is Also a book by David Reynolds it discusses the effects of the first World War the rest of the 20th century. And to a certain extent what is happening in the world today.
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Daily Facts about WW1 3 years 6 months ago #345240

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Daily Facts about WW1 3 years 5 months ago #346231

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The Battle of Arras (also known as the Second Battle of Arras) was a British offensive on the Western Front during World War I. From 9 April to 16 May 1917, British troops attacked German defences near the French city of Arras on the Western Front. There were big gains on the first day, followed by stalemate. The battle cost nearly 160,000 British and about 125,000 German casualties en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Arras_(1917)

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Daily Facts about WW1 3 years 5 months ago #346574

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www.historynet.com/red-baron-world-war-i...d-von-richthofen.htm
This is one of the best articles i have read about Der Rote Baron

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Daily Facts about WW1 3 years 5 months ago #347556

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Lloyd George, seen as an opponent of war until the Agadir Crisis of 1911, supported the entry of the British Empire into the First World War, not least as Belgium, for whose defence Britain was supposedly fighting, was a "small nation", like Wales or indeed South Africa.[29]

Lloyd George remained in office as Chancellor of the Exchequer for the first year of the Great War. The budget of 17 November 1914 had to allow for lower taxation receipts because of the reduction in world trade. The Crimean and Boer Wars had largely been paid for out of taxation; but Lloyd George raised debt financing of £321 million. Huge increases in Super Tax and income tax rates were not followed by sales and purchase tax revenue rises. While raising £63 million more, the budget was distinguished by the crude attempt to eradicate drinking during wartime, known as the King's Pledge.[30] en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Lloyd_George#First_World_War

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Daily Facts about WW1 3 years 5 months ago #347645

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Lieutenant David Endicott Putnam (1898-1918) scored 13 verifiable victories as an air ace during World War I, serving with both the French and U.S. air services.
...With the establishment of America's own equivalent air service Putnam was transferred across to the new service in June 1918. He specialised in flying fighter missions deep behind German lines on the Western Front. As a consequence although he was officially credited with 13 'kills', in all probability he tallied more than double this total.

Putnam was killed in action while on a flying mission on 12 September 1918 near Limey, shot down in his SPAD S.XIII by German ace Georg von Hantelmann. He was aged 19. www.firstworldwar.com/bio/putnam.htm

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Daily Facts about WW1 3 years 5 months ago #347751

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Daily Facts about WW1 3 years 5 months ago #347868

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Kurt Wolf (1895-1917) was one of Germany's highest-scoring air aces of the First World War, amassing some 33 victories prior to his death during active service on 15 September 1917...Receiving his commission in April 1915 he applied for and received a transfer to the German Imperial Air Service three months later. His early training was inauspicious: on his first instruction flight his instructor was killed while Wolff himself escaped with a dislocated shoulder.

Emerging from his period of training with a pilot's certificate in December 1915 Wolff saw service at Verdun in early 1916 with a KG unit and later that year during the closing stages of the Battle of the Somme with Jasta 11.

Known as 'tender little flower' among his fellow pilots ('zarte Bluemlein') for his shy demeanour Wolff was not initially a successful fighter pilot. It was only with the arrival of Manfred von Richthofen to command of Jasta 11 that both Wolff's and Jasta 11's performance picked up. www.firstworldwar.com/bio/wolff.htm

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Daily Facts about WW1 3 years 5 months ago #347904

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Name: Frank Linke-Crawford
Order of the Iron Crown Frank Linke-Crawford
Country: Austro-Hungarian Empire
Rank: Oberleutnant
Units: Flik 12, 41J, 60J
Victories: 27
Born: 18 August 1893
Place of Birth: Krakau (Cracow, Poland)
Killed In Action: 30 July 1918 Killed In Action
Place of Death: Near Guia
Cemetery: Kommunalfriedhof, Salzburg, Austria



After serving with a calvary regiment on the Russian front, Frank Linke-Crawford transferred to the Army Air Service in December 1915 and attended pilot's school in September 1916. Posted to Flik 12 in January 1917, he flew numerous reconnaissance and bombing missions on the Isonzo front. Flying an Aviatik C.I (37.08) without an observer, he was shot down on 2 August 1917, probably by Pier Piccio. On 4 August 1917, Linke was posted to Flik 41J and scored 13 victories by the end of the year. He assumed command of Flik 60J at the end of December 1917 and he scored 14 more victories before he was killed in action on the morning of 30 July 1918. Flying an Aviatik D.I, der Falke von Feltre (the Falcon of Feltre) was shot down by two Italian Hanriot HD.1 fighters from 81a Squadriglia. After the war, Linke's body was recovered and reinterred in Austria.

"Linke was both a fine flier and a fine man. He gave his men full support and generally ignored the rules about officers and non-officers having little to do with each other. He often gave away victories to other, less experienced pilots. As you can imagine, the feelings of his men for him were quite strong." Julius Arigi to Dr. Martin O'Connor, 6 October 197
www.theaerodrome.com/aces/austrhun/linke-crawford.php

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Daily Facts about WW1 3 years 4 months ago #349909

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"
The Battle of the Somme, also known as the Somme Offensive, was one of the largest battles of the First World War. Fought between July 1 and November 1, 1916 near the Somme River in France, it was also one of the bloodiest military battles in history. On the first day alone, the British suffered more than 57,000 casualties, and by the end of the campaign the Allies and Central Powers would lose more than 1.5 million men."
www.history.com/topics/world-war-i/battle-of-the-somme

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Daily Facts about WW1 3 years 4 months ago #349911

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I just watched two episodes of the 3 part BBC series Our World War.
In episode 2 a group of office workers from Levenshulme, Manchester join a local Pals battalion, the 18th Battalion, Manchester Regiment. They soon find themselves facing the Germans at the Somme. Months later, Paddy Kennedy pleads with the battalion chaplain to let him off the firing squad duty that will see him killing one of the friends he made on his journey. It's available on Netflix
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Last edit: by nightorado. Reason: Wrong title of the series

Daily Facts about WW1 3 years 4 months ago #349913

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nightorado wrote: I just watched two episodes of the 3 part BBC series Our War.
In episode 2 a group of office workers from Levenshulme, Manchester join a local Pals battalion, the 18th Battalion, Manchester Regiment. They soon find themselves facing the Germans at the Somme. Months later, Paddy Kennedy pleads with the battalion chaplain to let him off the firing squad duty that will see him killing one of the friends he made on his journey. It's available on Netflix

I watched that to!
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